Bridge Resilience Assessment with INSPIRE Data

Funding Agency: US Department of Transportation (USDOT) #00055082-02B

Role: PI

read more…

Probabilistic Multi-Scale Modeling of Interdependencies between Critical Infrastructure Systems for Resilience

Johansen, C., and Tien, I., “Probabilistic Multi-Scale Modeling of Interdependencies between Critical Infrastructure Systems for Resilience,” Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure, 2017

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Johansen and Tien, Probabilistic Multi-Scale Modeling of Interdependencies between Critical Infrastructure Systems for Resilience

Abstract — The prevalence of aging infrastructure and an increase in cascading failures have highlighted the need to focus on building strong, interdependent infrastructure read more…

Reliability Assessment of Critical Infrastructure Using Bayesian Networks

Tien, I., and Der Kiureghian, A., “Reliability Assessment of Critical Infrastructure Using Bayesian Networks,” ASCE Journal of Infrastructure Systems, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2017

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien and Der Kiureghian, Reliability Assessment of Critical Infrastructure Using Bayesian Networks

Abstract — The authors present a Bayesian network (BN)-based approach for modeling and reliability assessment of infrastructure systems. The BN is a powerful framework read more…

Tien invited to join nation’s brightest young engineers at 2017 Frontiers of Engineering symposium

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June 23, 2017

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Iris Tien will travel to Connecticut this fall for two days of meetings and idea-sharing with some of the nation’s most promising young engineers.

Organized by the National Academy of Engineering, the Frontiers of Engineering symposium gathers what the academy calls “exceptional” engineers from 30 to 45 years old to facilitate “cross-disciplinary exchange and promote the transfer of new techniques and approaches across fields in order to sustain and build U.S. innovative capacity.”

It’s a highly competitive and prestigious invitation extended to only 82 people this year, according to an academy news release.

“My research is highly interdisciplinary, and at the symposium, I am looking forward to connecting with colleagues across engineering,” said Tien, an assistant professor in the School.

read more…

Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling, Inference, and Reliability Assessment for Multistate Flow Networks

Tong, Y., and Tien, I., “Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling, Inference, and Reliability Assessment for Multistate Flow Networks,” ASCE Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering, Vol. 31, No. 5, September 2017

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tong and Tien, Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling, Inference, and Reliability Assessment for Multistate Flow Networks

Abstract — The Bayesian network (BN) is a useful tool for the modeling and reliability assessment of civil infrastructure systems. For a system comprising many read more…

WABE Closer Look: Manchester Bombing; I-85 Lessons; And More

May 24, 2017

 

Wednesday on “Closer Look with Rose Scott and Jim Burress:”

18:01: Dr. Iris Tien, an assistant professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, tells us what lessons can be learned after the reconstruction of the collapsed Interstate 85 bridge

 

 

 

Tien (center) with Jim Burress (left) and Rose Scott (right) after Tien’s interview on Atlanta’s infrastructure on the WABE program “Closer Look with Rose Scott and Jim Burress.” WABE is Atlanta’s NPR station.

Framework for Probabilistic Assessment of Maximum Nonlinear Structural Response Based on Sensor Measurements: Discretization and Estimation

Saini, A., and Tien, I., “Framework for Probabilistic Assessment of Maximum Nonlinear Structural Response Based on Sensor Measurements: Discretization and Estimation,” ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics, Vol. 143, No. 9, September 2017

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Saini and Tien, Framework for Probabilistic Assessment of Maximum Nonlinear Structural Response Based on Sensor Measurements: Discretization and Estimation

Abstract — A probabilistic framework to draw real-time inferences on the maximum response of an uncertain nonlinear structural system under stochastic excitation based on read more…

Impacts of Climate Change on the Assessment of Long-Term Structural Reliability

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Saini, A., and Tien, I., “Impacts of Climate Change on the Assessment of Long-Term Structural Reliability,” ASCE-ASME Journal of Risk and Uncertainty in Engineering Systems, Vol. 3, No. 3, September 2017

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Saini and Tien, Impacts of Climate Change on the Assessment of Long-Term Structural Reliability

Abstract — Global climate change has triggered studies across various science and engineering fields. This study demonstrates the need to account for climate change in assessing read more…

I-Corps: Software for Optimized Infrastructure Asset Management, Repair, and Recovery

Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF) Award #1712613

Role: PI

read more…

Awards recognize CEE’s top scientists, researchers, teachers and staff members

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November 14, 2016

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering recognized excellence in research, teaching and staff support at the School’s annual awards ceremony Nov. 14.

Karen and John Huff School Chair Reginald DesRoches handed out 17 awards to students, faculty and staff along with Ted Russell, chair of the School’s awards committee. The committee decided whom to honor based on the nominations of their colleagues or faculty advisers.

The committee will forward many of the School-level honorees for consideration in the Georgia Tech awards programs this spring.

This year’s winners:

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Iris Tien
Bill Schutz Junior Faculty Teaching Award

Recognized for her excellence in classroom teaching, evidenced by high scores from students on end-of-course surveys and recommendations from numerous colleagues.

Pipeline Blast Highlights Oil’s Achilles’ Heel

The Colonial Pipeline network’s most recent accident reminds us that our fossil fuel infrastructure is vulnerable

By Matt Smith  |  November 3, 2016  |  Sierra Magazine

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Colonial Pipeline fire | Photo courtesy of the Alabaster Fire Department

An explosion that sent a column of smoke towering over the Alabama hills has Southeastern cities bracing for possible price spikes and gasoline shortages for the second time in six weeks.

The Monday afternoon explosion has again shut down the 5,500-mile Colonial Pipeline network, which funnels fuel from Houston to New Jersey—showing the extent to which America’s fossil fuel infrastructure is vulnerable.

“I think the effect may be pretty immediate, given the volume that goes through that pipeline,” said Dr. Iris Tien, an assistant professor of civil engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. “One of the shortcomings of our infrastructure is we don’t have a lot of redundancy when it comes to these gas pipelines, so we rely on very few sources for a lot of our supply.”  read more…

Failing infrastructure: We can’t fix it all, so Chloe Johansen’s research will help us prioritize

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October 20, 2016

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Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen, third from left, brainstorms with her group members on an October morning. Their group is part of the Scheller College of Business’ Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results program (TI:GER). Johansen is working with two business students and two Emory University law students to commercialize her Ph.D. research. She’s trying to create software to model the behavior and interdependence of infrastructure systems. The group members are, left to right, Scheller MBA student Greg Van Volkenburg, Emory law student Ruohong Yao, Johansen, MBA student Chris Bergman, and law student Victoria Sparks. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

America’s infrastructure systems are in terrible shape and getting worse.

That’s been the refrain from the American Society of Civil Engineers since its most-recent infrastructure report card found virtually all of the nation’s systems for moving people, energy, commerce, waste are falling apart.

The organization estimates we’ll need to spend $3.6 trillion — with a “t” — by 2020 just to repair or replace what’s failing.

Enter Chloe Johansen, a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student working in Assistant Professor Iris Tien’s research group.

read more…

Metrics for Evaluating and Improving Community Resilience

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Johansen, C., Horney, J., and Tien, I., “Metrics for Evaluating and Improving Community Resilience,” ASCE Journal of Infrastructure Systems, Vol. 23, No. 2, June 2017

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Johansen, Horney, and Tien, Metrics for Evaluating and Improving Community Resilience

Abstract — The growing risk of natural and artificial or manufactured hazards combined with a lack of community preparedness have revealed the necessity for comprehensive read more…

Tien wins award for helping bring engineering concepts to middle school science lessons

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August 29, 2016

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Iris Tien, left, with Gwinnett County middle school teacher Kathylee McElroy and Jamila Cola after Tien and McElroy won awards for their collaboration on engineering lesson plans for McElroy’s science classes. They’ve been working together for two years through a program made possible by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research, Innovation, and Multi-Scale Engineering. Cola is the director of that program.

Georgia Tech’s K-12 outreach program has recognized Assistant Professor Iris Tien for her work helping some Atlanta-area middle school students learn about engineering.

Tien has been working with Northbrook Middle School teacher Kathylee McElroy to incorporate engineering concepts into McElroy’s science lessons. The collaboration won Tien and McElroy 2016 Paul A. Duke GIFT Action Plan Achievement awards earlier this month from Georgia Tech’s Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics and Computing (CEISMC).

“It is important to expose students to engineering concepts early, including ideas about risk and hazards, and building civil engineering structures to withstand those hazards,” said Tien, whose work includes risk assessment and decision-making under uncertain conditions.  read more…

Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling and Reliability Assessment of Infrastructure Systems

RESSTien, I., and Der Kiureghian, A., “Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling and Reliability Assessment of Infrastructure Systems,” Reliability Engineering and System Safety, Vol. 156, pp. 134-147, December 2016

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien and Der Kiureghian, Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling and Reliability Assessment of Infrastructure Systems

Abstract — Novel algorithms are developed to enable the modeling of large, complex infrastructure systems as Bayesian networks (BNs). These include a compression read more…

Building Infrastructure, Building Communities

By Iris Tien  |  July 19, 2016

INSS SLS Photo TienA neighborhood on the Westside of Atlanta, an example of the premise that has been stuck in Iris Tien’s mind recently: how the infrastructure civil and environmental engineers build — or the lack thereof in areas like this — influences the surrounding community. (Photo: Iris Tien)

It has been more than a month since the Integrated Network for Social Sustainability (INSS) Conference, organized in part by Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) at Georgia Tech, and the topics we discussed still stay with me. As a civil engineer, what has specifically stuck with me, and what I think will continue to color how I think about social sustainability, is the vital role of civil infrastructure in building communities.  read more…

Probabilistic Framework for Assessing Maximum Structural Response Based on Sensor Measurements

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Tien, I., Pozzi, M., and Der Kiureghian, A., “Probabilistic Framework for Assessing Maximum Structural Response Based on Sensor Measurements,” Structural Safety, Vol. 61, pp. 43-56, July 2016

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien et al, Probabilistic Framework for Assessing Maximum Structural Response Based on Sensor Measurements

Abstract — A probabilistic framework for Bayesian inference combined with extreme values of Gaussian processes is proposed to assess the maximum of the response of an read more…

National Academies Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable (GUIRR): Critical Infrastructure Security

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GT in DC  |  Prepared by Lewis-Burke Associates LLC  |  February 29, 2016

Click for full text of National Academies-published Meeting-in-Brief (pdf): Critical Infrastructure Security: The Role of Public-Private Partnerships

On February 24, Iris Tien, Assistant Professor at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, participated in a panel discussion on threat and impact modeling, at the National Academy’s Critical Infrastructure Security event in Washington, DC.  read more…

Detection of Damage and Failure Events of Critical Public Infrastructure Using Social Sensor Big Data

IoTBD2016-logoTien, I., Musaev, A., Benas, D., Ghadi, A., Goodman, S., and Pu, C., “Detection of Damage and Failure Events of Critical Public Infrastructure Using Social Sensor Big Data,” Proceedings of the International Conference on Internet of Things and Big Data (IoTBD 2016), Rome, Italy, pp. 435-440, April 23-25, 2016

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien et al, Detection of Damage and Failure Events of Critical Public Infrastructure Using Social Sensor Big Data

Abstract — Public infrastructure systems provide many of the services that are critical to the health, functioning, and security of society. Many of these infrastructures, however, lack continuous physical sensor read more…

CEE 8813: Engineering Risk Analysis (new course)

Semesters Taught: Spring 2016

Level: Graduate
Class Size: 20

Course Objectives:

This course presents fundamental concepts of probability theory, risk analysis, and decision theory through their application to civil engineering systems. It introduces students to the many sources of uncertainty that influence engineering decisions, and provides tools and methods to model and analyze these uncertainties in the context of engineering risk assessment. Emphasis is placed on probabilistic modeling and topics covered include: random variables and functions of random variables, probability distributions for risk analysis in civil and environmental engineering problems, Bayesian methods, and risk-informed decision making.

CRISP Type 1: Multi-Scale Modeling Framework for the Assessment and Control of Resilient Interdependent Critical Infrastructure Systems

Funding Agency: National Science Foundation (NSF) Award #1541074

Role: PI

read more…

Tien invited to Arab-American Frontiers Symposium on sensing technology and applications

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October 1, 2015

Some of the world’s brightest scholars gather in Saudi Arabia in December to talk about the latest advances in sensing technologies and networks.

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Iris Tien has been invited to join them.  read more…

Tien wins NSF funding to improve reliability of our interdependent infrastructure

 

 

September 17, 2015

GT CEE Tien_cropThe National Science Foundation has awarded Iris Tien $499,920 for a three-year project that will develop new computer models of infrastructure systems and the connections between them.

The idea is to create a model that can be used for any infrastructure system — water, power, transportation, or communications, for example — and takes into account each component of the system as well as how the system interacts with other infrastructure.

The result will be software that can help utilities make real-time decisions and even automatically adjust how infrastructure operates to account for problems.

“Infrastructure systems are very critical to a functioning society, how we go about our day-to-day lives. They’re critical for the security of our country and for being able to be productive and healthy and safe,” Tien said. “As these systems are subject to more and more hazards of different types, it’s really important for us to be able to model these systems properly and to be able to make decisions about how we manage these systems so they perform better under different adverse conditions.”

NSF CRISP Tweet

read more…

NSF invests $20 million to enhance resilience of critical infrastructure

NSF-logoPress Release 15-108  |  September 14, 2015

Infrastructure must outsmart disruptions to continue delivery of essential goods and services

Americans rely upon critical infrastructure systems to provide services such as clean water, electricity, transportation and healthcare. These systems are becoming increasingly interconnected, while our demands on them and the hazards they face grow.

To address our nation’s critical need for more resilient infrastructure and enhanced services, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has invested $20 million in new fundamental research to transform infrastructure, from physical structures to responsive systems.

read more…

Leading the Way in Women Engineering Faculty

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Number of COE Women Faculty Puts Tech at the Top Nationally

The relatively low proportion of women in academic science and engineering has been the topic of numerous recent books and reports but as Bob Dylan sang “the times they are a changing.”

Gender diversity has become more valued among college faculty and the College of Engineering has been aggressive in trying to address women’s underrepresentation in the faculty as well as student ranks. The proportion of engineering doctoral degrees earned by women has risen considerably in the past several decades and with it has come opportunities to recruit more women to faculty positions. Today, Tech is the number one producer of women engineers in the country and a leader in female engineering faculty.

Tien_WomenFacultyGTMeet some of our “Women in Engineering” faculty members who are changing the world with their research as well as the face of engineering.

Dr. Iris Tien

How would you explain your research?

My research is in creating new ways to model and assess the reliability of complex civil infrastructure systems, including water, energy, communications, and transportation systems. The goal is that flexible and sophisticated models combined with data from a variety of sources will help us make smarter decisions in how we manage these systems so they perform better when bad things happen.

read more…

Why Georgia Tech: Questions with Iris Tien

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By Amelia Pavlik  |  February 10, 2015

Tien_WhyGTIris Tien is an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech. Recently, the Office of Faculty Affairs had the opportunity to learn more about Tien and her time at Tech. Here’s what she said.

Tell us a little about your research.

I develop new ways to model and assess the reliability of civil infrastructure systems, including water, power, and transportation systems. The goal is to help us make smarter decisions in how we design and manage these critical systems, so they perform better under adverse conditions. What can we do, for example, read more…

Impact of LRFD Seismic Bridge Design for Georgia

Funding Agency: Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) Project #RF471

Role: Co-PI

read more…

Compression and Inference Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling of Infrastructure Systems

ICASP-logoTien, I., and Der Kiureghian, A., “Compression and Inference Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling of Infrastructure Systems,” In T. Haukaas, ed., Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering, Vancouver, Canada, July 12-15, 2015

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien and Der Kiureghian, Compression and Inference Algorithms for Bayesian Network Modeling of Infrastructure Systems

Abstract — The Bayesian network (BN) is an ideal tool for modeling and assessing the reliability of civil infrastructure, particularly when the information about the system and its components is uncertain and read more…

A Dynamic Bayesian Network Framework for Risk Assessment of Systems Based on Sensor Measurements

ICASP-logoTien, I., Pozzi, M., and Der Kiureghian, A., “A Dynamic Bayesian Network Framework for Risk Assessment of Systems Based on Sensor Measurements,” In T. Haukaas, ed., Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering, Vancouver, Canada, July 12-15, 2015

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien et al, A Dynamic Bayesian Network Framework for Risk Assessment of Systems Based on Sensor Measurements

Abstract — In this paper, a framework based the dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) is proposed to dynamically monitor the response of structures to hazards. The methodology enables the probabilistic analysis of read more…

Bayesian Network Methods for Modeling and Reliability Assessment of Infrastructure Systems

SEITien, I., “Bayesian Network Methods for Modeling and Reliability Assessment of Infrastructure Systems,” ASCE Structural Engineering Institute Structures Congress, Portland, OR, April 23-25, 2015

Tien Research Group


 
 
 
 
 
 

Summer 2017: from left: Ph.D. student Cynthia Lee, Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen, Ph.D. student Ajay Saini, Ph.D. student Yanjie Tong, PI Tien

Tien Research Group Fall 2016

Fall 2016: from left: Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen, Ph.D. student Cynthia Lee,
PI Tien, Ph.D. student Yanjie Tong, Ph.D. student Ajay Saini

read more…

CEE 6549: Structural Reliability

Semesters Taught: Spring 2017, Spring 2015

Level: Graduate
Class Size: 15

Course Objectives:

This course presents a comprehensive and in-depth coverage of modern methods for structural and system reliability assessment. It provides insights and perspectives on the use of probability-based tools and methods for the analysis of the reliability of structures under hazards, and serves to establish a strong starting point for research in the field of structural reliability. Topics include multivariate distribution models; formulation of structural reliability for components and systems; exact solutions; computational reliability methods, including first- and second-order reliability methods, Monte Carlo simulation, and importance sampling; reliability sensitivities; importance measures; and reliability analysis under statistical and model uncertainties.

10(ish) questions with new faculty member Iris Tien

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September 30, 2014

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Iris Tien is the newest member of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty, joining the school this fall after completing her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. She took a few minutes recently to talk about her work and why it’s important to her.

Q: I was reading a little bit about your background and I saw you started out in medical research when you were an undergrad studying civil engineering. How did that happen?

A: I’m not your most traditional civil engineering person. read more…

CEE 4100: Construction Engineering and Management

Semesters Taught: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014

Level: Upper-division undergraduate
Class size: 70

Course Objectives:

This course provides fundamental concepts in the planning, design, and construction of civil engineering projects. It provides an introduction to the topics of project delivery, contracts, engineering economics, cost estimation, bidding, risk analysis, scheduling, project controls, and construction law, and presents tools and techniques for the management and control of resources (e.g., time, money) on construction engineering projects.

A Compression Algorithm for Inference in Bayesian Network Models of Infrastructure Systems

Tien, I., and Der Kiureghian, A., “A Compression Algorithm for Inference in Bayesian Network Models of Infrastructure Systems,” ASCE Engineering Mechanics Institute Conference, Evanston, IL, August 4-7, 2013

Compression Algorithm for Bayesian Network Modeling of Binary Systems

Tien, I., and Der Kiureghian, A., “Compression Algorithm for Bayesian Network Modeling of Binary Systems,” In G. Deodatis, B. Ellingwood, and D. Frangopol, eds., Safety, Reliability, Risk and Life-Cycle Performance of Structures and Infrastructures, New York: CRC Press, pp. 3075-3081, June 2013

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien and Der Kiureghian, Compression Algorithm for Bayesian Network Modeling of Binary Systems

Abstract — A Bayesian network (BN) is a useful tool for analyzing the reliability of systems. The BN framework is limited, however, by the size and complexity of the system that can be tractably modeled. Each node in read more…

Inference on Maximum Structural Response Based on Measured Accelerations Using Dynamic Bayesian Network

Tien, I., Pozzi, M., and Der Kiureghian, A., “Inference on Maximum Structural Response Based on Measured Accelerations Using Dynamic Bayesian Network,” In G. Deodatis, B. Ellingwood, and D. Frangopol, eds. Safety, Reliability, Risk and Life-Cycle Performance of Structures and Infrastructures, New York: CRC Press, pp. 2481-2488, June 2013

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien et al, Inference on Maximum Structural Response Based on Measured Accelerations Using Dynamic Bayesian Network

Abstract — A dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) is a useful tool for analyzing uncertain systems that evolve with time. As such, it is useful in structural health monitoring applications where measurements can be read more…

Research Profiles – Iris Tien

It’s easy to forget that consequences, even unintended ones, sometimes can be positive.

After Hurricane Katrina closed universities in New Orleans, UC officials offered students a chance to spend fall semester of 2005 at various UC campuses, including Berkeley.  Their only motive was humanitarian. But the gesture affected students, including at least one at UC Berkeley, in unanticipated ways.

Iris Tien was an undergraduate then. As a resident assistant, responsible for two floors of an eight-floor dormitory, she was responsible for converting dormitory lounges into bedrooms and hosting events to help the New Orleans students feel at home.

Fast forward seven years. As a 24-year-old civil and environmental engineering graduate student in UC Berkeley’s Civil Systems Program, Tien is modeling complex infrastructure — research that might someday be used to determine weak spots in bridges, highways and water systems, including the kinds of levees that broke under the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina.

As the U.S. grapples with declining infrastructure and tight budgets, Tien’s work could prove particularly useful.  Last year, the American Society of Civil Engineers reported that the poor condition of our highways, railroads, bridges and transit systems cost $130 billion in 2010 alone.  To bring infrastructure back to minimum standards, the U.S. would need to invest $846 billion over nine years, or $94 billion per year.  Yet partisan politics is keeping investment at a minimum.

It’s no wonder that Tien’s research on infrastructure cost-saving is getting attention. read more…

2012 Fellows Reception

By Dick Corten, slideshow by Peg Skorpinksi  |  March 21, 2012

It was not hard for a good time to be had by all. The atmosphere was convivial, the mood was celebratory, there were plenty of people to talk to, and — always a priority for grad students — there was food. And not only that, the food was good.

The occasion was the Berkeley Distinguished Graduate Fellows Reception, an annual event, held this year in the banner-festooned auditorium of International House read more…

Using a Wireless Inertial Sensor System to Characterize Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease

Tien, I., and Aminoff, M., “Using a Wireless Inertial Sensor System to Characterize Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease,” Movement Disorders, Vol. 27, Issue Supplement S1, pp. S142, June 2012

Graduate students take their research to the Capitol

By Nicole Freeling  |  March 15, 2012

To many people, graduate student research is a little-known corridor in the halls of higher education. To some it is perceived as a mysterious side nook in the ivory tower, where esoteric research is conducted for obscure ends.

On March 14, a delegation of 20 graduate students and deans traveled to Sacramento to give lawmakers a very different perspective: that of graduate student research as central not only to the future of the University of California, but to that of the state and the nation as well.  read more…

Impact of Online Marketing Channels on Customer Purchase Visits: Aggregate- and Individual-Level Models

Tien, I., and Jamal, Z., “Impact of Online Marketing Channels on Customer Purchase Visits: Aggregate- and Individual-Level Models,” HP Labs Technical Report, August 2011

Intern profile – Iris Tien

This is a series of profiles featuring interviews with some of this year’s crop of summer interns at HP Labs.

We continue the series with an interview with Iris Tien who was recruited by the Services Research Lab.

A Bay Area native, Iris Tien gets to stay with her parents in Cupertino while interning at HP Labs’ Palo Alto campus.  “It’s good, actually!” she assures us, “plus I get to bike to work about twice a week.”  Usually, Tien lives over in Berkeley, where she’s entering her fourth year as a PhD student in Systems Engineering at the University of California.  She attended UC Berkeley as an undergraduate, too, majoring in Civil and Environmental Engineering.  When she’s not crunching numbers, Tien enjoys playing basketball and tennis, listening to opera, and making jewelry.

HP: What have you been working on during your internship?
I’ve been working with Zainab Jamal and Fereydoon Safai in HP’s Services Research Lab as part of the Marketing Optimization Project. Specifically, I’ve been looking at HP customer data and relating it to how HP spends its online marketing resources.  I’m interested in understanding how the channels through which people arrive at the HP Shopping site – like search, coupons or email — impact what different customers do.

HP: Can you tell us what you’ve found out?
Well, a lot of this is proprietary, but read more…

Characterization of Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease Using a Wireless Inertial Sensor System

Tien, I., Glaser, S., and Aminoff, M., “Characterization of Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease Using a Wireless Inertial Sensor System,” 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, Buenos Aires, Argentina, pp. 3353-3356, August 31-September 4, 2010

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien et al, Characterization of Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease Using a Wireless Inertial Sensor System

Abstract — Gait analysis is important in diagnosing and evaluating certain neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this paper, we show the ability of our wireless inertial sensor system to read more…

Results of Using a Wireless Inertial Measuring System to Quantify Gait Motions in Control Subjects

Tien, I., Glaser, S., Bajcsy, R., Goodin, D., and Aminoff, M., “Results of Using a Wireless Inertial Measuring System to Quantify Gait Motions in Control Subjects,” IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Vol. 14, No. 4, pp. 904-915, July 2010

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien et al, Results of Using a Wireless Inertial Measuring System to Quantify Gait Motions in Control Subjects

Abstract — Gait analysis is important for the diagnosis of many neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s. The discovery and interpretation of minor gait abnormalities can aid in early diagnosis. We have used an read more…

Structural Health Monitoring and Evaluation of Human Gait to Assist in the Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

Tien, I., and Glaser, S., “Structural Health Monitoring and Evaluation of Human Gait to Assist in the Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease,” Proceedings, 7th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA, September 9-11, 2009

Click for full text of paper (pdf): Tien and Glaser, Structural Health Monitoring and Evaluation of Human Gait to Assist in the Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

Abstract — The human body is a complex structure, and its structural health can be monitored using sensors. A system using wireless inertial measurement units for data acquisition and the monitoring of human read more…

Detecting and Quantifying Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Patients Using Wireless Inertial Measurement Units

Tien, I., “Detecting and Quantifying Gait Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Patients Using Wireless Inertial Measurement Units,” Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society Open House, Berkeley EECS Annual Research Symposium, Berkeley, CA, February 2009

Quantifying Diagnosis of Neurological Conditions

Tien, I., “Quantifying Diagnosis of Neurological Conditions,” Scientific Colloquium for Healthcare, Engineering and Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center, Davis, CA, May 2008

Nathaniel Butler, Audra Nemir, and Iris Tien Win NSF Scholarships

Nathaniel Butler and Audra Nemir, graduate students in Environmental Engineering, and Iris Tien, graduating CEE undergraduate entering the Civil Systems program in fall 2008, received National Science Foundation Scholarships.  Nathaniel’s adviser is Professor James Hunt.  Audra’s adviser is Professor Lisa Alvarez-Cohen.  Iris’s adviser with be Professor Steven Glaser.

Congratulations, Nathaniel, Audra, and Iris!

Iris Tien and Jenna Wong Awarded Chancellor’s Fellowships

Two graduating CEE seniors, Iris Tien and Jenna Wong, were awarded Chancellor’s Fellowships. Chancellor’s Fellowships are given to exceptional students of outstanding achievement who are entering a Berkeley doctoral program. Iris will enter the Civil Systems program and Jenna will enter the Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Materials program.

Congratulations, Iris and Jenna!

Quantifying Diagnosis of Neurological Conditions

Tien, I., “Quantifying Diagnosis of Neurological Conditions,” Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society Open House, Berkeley EECS Annual Research Symposium, February 2008

Multidisciplinary Research

The University of California, Berkeley is one of the world’s premier research universities, maintaining a dynamic environment in which top-notch researchers create and freely disseminate the very best scholarly contributions and scientific discoveries. Berkeley is consistently rated among the very best institutions for the quality and breadth of its research enterprise, the scholarly distinction of its faculty, and the excellence of its Ph.D. programs.

Berkeley researchers — many of them leading experts in their fields — are dispersed among more than 130 academic departments and more than 80 interdisciplinary research units. The Berkeley research enterprise spans the full spectrum of the discovery process — from basic research that fuels remarkable, and sometimes unforeseen, breakthroughs to applied, late-stage projects that offer actionable solutions to real-world problems.

Designing for Designers: Lessons Learned from Schools of Architecture

 

Cranz, G., Wendover, J., Tien, I., Gillem, M., and Norman, J., “Chapter 9: A Post-Occupancy Evaluation of the Temporary Home of the College of Environmental Design on the UC Berkeley Campus,” Designing for Designers: Lessons Learned from Schools of Architecture, Fairchild Books, September 2007

Post-Occupancy Evaluation of the San Francisco Public Library

Cranz, G., and Tien, I., “Post-Occupancy Evaluation of the San Francisco Public Library,” Annual Conference of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology, San Jose, CA, October 26-28, 2006

Pop Quiz

If your department were a car, what car would it be?

 

 

Iris Tien, CEE sophomore

A pickup truck because it’s very practical and can carry around a bunch of construction materials.

Senior Send-Offs Commence: Academy Orchestra Concert

By Jina Lee  |  March 8, 2003

Two young talented musicians, both Phillips Academy seniors, captivated the packed audience in the Cochran Chapel last Friday night with their passionate performances. The concert also showcased the results of the hard work and dedication of the orchestras and ensembles over the course of the term.  read more…

Welcoming Faces

By Michelle Ku  |  September 1, 1999

For a new sixth or seventh grader, life at a middle school can be a frightening prospect. But the Cupertino Union School District is taking steps to quell these fears.

This year, all four middle schools are implementing WEB–Welcome Every Body–an orientation program that helps students transition and acclimate themselves from elementary school to the middle school environment.  read more…